MacArtney connects to the talent of tomorrow

Tags: macartney group

Mutual learning and innovation was on top of the agenda, as MacArtney Inc. spent a weekend in the inspirational company of the underwater technology talent of tomorrow.

ROVs at NASA, Johnson Space Center
Only a few weeks ago, a dedicated team of MacArtney representatives and technicians payed a visit to the NASA Johnson Space Center, where the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) astronaut training facility hosted the regional branch of the annual international MATE (Marine Advanced Technology Education) students underwater robotics and ROV competition.

Operating out of the brand new MacArtney Mobile Workshop, MacArtney technicians assisted the participating high school and college students, working on their own ROVs, with advice, vehicle repair, cabling and connectivity.



Empowering future ROV innovators
As an industry leading company within underwater technology, featuring an extensive track record with regards to the interfacing, instrumentation, launch and recovery of remotely operated vehicle systems - MacArtney was extremely pleased with this opportunity to connect with potential future ROV innovators. The experienced MacArtney technicians were truly impressed by the scope and complexity of the MATE ROV projects and setups, as of which several might undoubtedly be serious contenders for the 2013 MATE title.

According to MacArtney Inc. President Lars F. Hansen, MacArtney will always give priority to supporting and empowering talented young professionals within the realm of underwater technology. "Whether they will turn out as future colleagues, clients or competitors - these young people represent the foundation upon which we will continue to build and develop our industry".



The MATE ROV Competition
The regional MATE competition, attended and sponsored by MacArtney, is part of an international event, supported by a network of 22 regional contests that take place across the US, Canada, Hong Kong, Scotland, Japan, and Egypt.

Student teams from upper elementary schools, middle schools, high schools, home schools, community colleges and universities, participate.

The competition consists of three different classes that vary depending on the sophistication of the ROVs and mission requirements. The MATE competition requires students to think of themselves as entrepreneurs and transform their teams into companies that not only design and engineer, however, manufacture, market, and sell products. The different projects are evaluated by industry professionals who serve as competition judges.

By connecting students with employers and professionals from the workplace, the competition also exposes students to ocean-related career opportunities and help them to see the pathways to those careers.